shvyac38e4

Shv Yac Yac de Ventspils Municipality, Latvia de Ventspils Municipality, Latvia

Lecteur Shv Yac Yac de Ventspils Municipality, Latvia

Shv Yac Yac de Ventspils Municipality, Latvia

shvyac38e4

Debout sur une plage avec un pistolet dans ma main ... Pourquoi s'en soucier? Voilà ce que j'ai appris. Quel que soit mon choix, cela revient au même, absolument rien.

shvyac38e4

Ce livre est tellement bon. Lis le. Lisez-le, lisez-le. Et puis allez écouter de la musique folk lo-fi ou Alan Lomax.

shvyac38e4

Des personnages en deux dimensions dans une intrigue aussi mince que le proscuitto. Poussin éclairé à la hauteur d'une peluche loufoque.

shvyac38e4

If there is one subject I struggle with, it's the hard sciences. But Brian Greene's book is written exactly for people like me who probably haven't picked up a science book since high school and are mathmatically handicapped. And given the importance of the research going on, the discoveries so far, and the possibilities that are coming soon that may change our world in some really significant ways, it is also an important book. In a nutshell, Greene delivers what we know and what we theorize about what, exactly, the reality of the universe is: what it is made out of, how it functions, and how it may have come about. Here are explanations of what "dimensions" are, why Higgs particles are the subject of furious exploration, and why huge supercolliders are being built. More to the point for the reader is that this book is great exercise for you imagination, trying to wrap your brain cells around concepts like braneworlds, "strings," and "dark matter." These are concepts I run across rather frequently when I pick up a science fiction novel--this will definitely help my understanding of some of the high concepts there. But more exciting is the fact that the reality of this frontier of science is, in many ways, more fantastic and epic than fiction!