crystal564

Mateusz Olszewski Olszewski de Kangaltekkesi/Sivas, Turkey de Kangaltekkesi/Sivas, Turkey

Lecteur Mateusz Olszewski Olszewski de Kangaltekkesi/Sivas, Turkey

Mateusz Olszewski Olszewski de Kangaltekkesi/Sivas, Turkey

crystal564

Je l'admets, je suis fan de chic éclairé. Mais c'était un peu trop chic pour moi. Cela a fonctionné un peu trop bien. Et les voix sur l'audio m'ont rendu fou. Blech.

crystal564

Eric Schlosser présente une perspective plus profonde et désespérément nécessaire sur l'industrie de la restauration rapide. Le style d'écriture établit un bon équilibre entre des faits simples et des récits qui transmettent les aspects émotionnels et humains de l'impact de la restauration rapide tout en présentant les informations de manière honnête. J'ai été impressionné par l'ampleur de ce livre. Schlosser révèle l'influence de grande envergure de la nation de la restauration rapide, couvrant des sujets tels que l'impact environnemental, l'économie de la franchise et l'énorme agro-industrie, les droits de l'homme et les questions de sécurité alimentaire dans l'industrie de l'emballage de viande, et l'impact sur la santé du monde à mesure que l'obésité et le diabète augmentent à mesure que la consommation de fast-food devient plus courante. Un livre bien écrit et informatif, c'est une lecture obligatoire pour tous ceux qui participent à la nation de la restauration rapide et ceux qui ont la capacité de le changer.

crystal564

Je l'ai terminé il y a quelques jours et je continue à y penser.

crystal564

Je suis peut-être trop attiré par les histoires d'abeilles.

crystal564

I attempted to start this book in college (horrifying to say it, but . . nearly twenty years ago!) I attempted to read it again a few other times. I have finally ~ FINALLY ~ read this book through. When checking off books on the (BBC) Top 100 list that I've read I can check it off and then I can repeatedly ask myself . . WHY? Why is this book in the Top 100? Why did it win a Pulitzer Prize? Why did I feel the need to read this thing through? Am I a perpetual optimist (unlike any single character in the entire book)? Did I think that surely it must get better or that the ending would be a "wowzer" that made the slow start, the obnoxious and thoroughly unlikeable characters and the story line worth it?! Truth be told, if there is some deepness to this story at all (& there probably is), I let it fly over my head. I think it would have meant more if I'd finished it in college; perhaps it could have been profound. As it was, I saw nothing profound about the story at all. Pros (as I attempt to find the silver lining): * The characters are well-developed. They are also amazingly obnoxious, annoying and unlikeable; few have redeeming qualities. * The book is well-named. It is a confederacy of dunces. * The writing is fantastic; the descriptions nearly perfect. You can definitely see the portly, grotesque Ignatius J. Reilly, his mother and the other characters. I hope it is the writing alone that got this book the Pulitzer Prize, because the rest of the story did not deserve such grandness. * I did laugh . . once . . maybe twice. It is NOT, however, the humorous, laugh-out-loud side acher that the reviews plastered all over the cover would lead you to believe. In fact, it is more pathetic, sad and obnoxious than it is humorous. I found myself feeling sorry for nearly every character at some point or another. And, when I wasn't feeling sorry for them, I really just wanted to slap the living crude out of them. Okay, so my silver lining is more grey. Much like this book. How appropriate!!

crystal564

Creepy, weird, dark, and wonderful, as so many of Neil Gaiman's books are. I read Neverwhere towards the beginning of my junior year abroad in London, and it really worked out, as the main character is rather a newcomer to London himself. The BBC has a not half bad miniseries of the book.